Joseph Priestley Society Symposium

April 13, 2017
11:00 a.m.–2:30 p.m.
Chemical Heritage Foundation
315 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106
United States

the Institute is pleased to welcome Noah Clay, director, Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility, School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Pennsylvania. Clay will moderate the April 2017 JPS symposium, “Emerging Companies Based on Inventions at the Singh Center for Nanotechnology of the University of Pennsylvania.”

The Singh Center for Nanotechnology is a next-generation nanotechnology center that merges traditional approaches to nanoscale development with unique state-of-the-art equipment, materials, and ideas. With a focus on innovation, the Singh Center is a hub for scientists and researchers that integrates nanofabrication and nanocharacterization equipment to define new frontiers in nanotechnology. The center boasts expert and experienced faculty and staff who are committed to the success of its users and interested in new approaches to realizing and implementing nanotechnology applications. Located on the University of Pennsylvania campus, the Singh Center, which is open to all institutions—academic and industrial—epitomizes Penn’s philosophy of pursuing knowledge beyond traditional boundaries.

The symposium will present some of the work being done at the center, with an emphasis on the users’ results and the facility’s entrepreneurial benefit.


Event Schedule

  • 11:00 a.m.
    Networking Reception
  • 11:45 p.m.
    Luncheon
  • 12:30 p.m. 
    Symposium

About the Moderator

Noah Clay
Director, Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility, University of Pennsylvania

Noah Clay

Noah Clay

Noah Clay

Prior to joining Penn in 2013, Noah Clay managed nanoscale process integration at Cornell University, developing and implementing advanced device applications. He also served as nanofabrication manager at the Harvard University Center for Nanoscale Systems, where he was responsible for day-to-day operations of its cleanroom and for managing associated technical staff.  Clay has held technical staff positions at United Technologies in Princeton, New Jersey, and at Infinera Corporation in Silicon Valley, California, where he fabricated photon-counting devices and photonic integrated circuits, respectively. He attended the State University of New York, earning an undergraduate degree in physics (Honors) and performed master’s work in electrical engineering at Tufts University.

 

About the Panelists

Eric Detsi
Stephenson Term Chair Assistant Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania

Eric Detsi

Eric Detsi

Eric Detsi

Eric Detsi’s primary research interests involve the novel design and synthesis of metal-based 3D nanostructured materials with enhanced properties for structural and functional applications. His approach is to apply the natural sciences, primarily physics and chemistry, to solve engineering problems. In particular, Detsi exploits the crystal structure of multiphase nonprecious metal alloys to engineer nanoporous materials with hierarchical porosity after selective leaching. Hierarchical porous structures are attractive as alloy-type anode materials in alkali and alkaline-earth metals batteries because the macropores (50–1,000 nm) are needed for long-range electrolyte diffusion through the material, while the mesopores (2–50 nm) and micropores (<2 nm) are needed to create high-surface area and short diffusion paths for alkali or alkaline-earth metals. More important, micro- and mesopores are needed to accommodate the large volume changes taking place in high-capacity alloy-type battery anodes during their alloying reactions with alkali or alkaline-earth metals. Detsi also takes advantage of state-of-the-art thin-film deposition techniques such as plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition, combined with his expertise in top-down nanofabrication by selective leaching, to engineer novel 3D nanocomposites for critical energy applications.

Detsi received a BS in applied physics/biomedical technology from the University of Groningen, and an MS and a PhD in applied physics from the Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen. He has also done postdoctoral research at the University of California, Los Angeles.
 

David Issadore
Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania

David Issadore

David Issadore

David Issadore

David Issadore’s research focuses on the integration of microelectronics, microfluidics, nanomaterials, and molecular targeting and their application to medicine. This multidisciplinary approach enables Issadore’s lab to explore new technologies to bring medical diagnostics from expensive, centralized facilities directly to clinical and resource-limited settings for applications including early detection of pancreatic cancer, diagnosis of tuberculosis in patients coinfected with HIV, and prognosis of traumatic brain injury. His academic background—he earned a PhD in electrical engineering and applied physics from Harvard University in 2009—and his research experience in Massachusetts General Hospital’s research laboratory have prepared him to work and collaborate effectively on these inherently crossdisciplinary problems.


The Joseph Priestley Society (JPS) lecture series explores topics in science, technology, and industry through professional networking receptions and lectures by industry leaders.

For more information about this event, please contact Sarah Reisert at 215.873.8263 or sreisert@sciencehistory.org.