Chemistry World: Ida Noddack and the Trouble with Element 43

Royal Society of Chemistry’s magazine talks to the Institute’s Brigitte van Tiggelen about the little-known German chemist.

May 19, 2021

Brigitte van Tiggelen, director of European operations at the Science History Institute, lends her expertise to this article in Chemistry World about German chemist Ida Noddack as part of the publication’s “Significant Figures” series on forgotten scientists. Noddack, who discovered the element rhenium in 1925, may have been the first to suggest nuclear fission four years before the idea was widely accepted.

Read more on chemistryworld.com >>

Photograph © Ullstein Bild/Getty Images/Frame © Swindler & Swindler @ Folio Art

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