HISTORY This Week: The Sky Is Falling

History Channel podcast features Institute’s oral history interview with Nobel laureate and ozone savior Mario Molina.

October 18, 2021

The Science History Institute’s oral history interview with Nobel Prize-winning scientist Mario Molina (pictured left) was featured in HISTORY This Week, a podcast series produced by HISTORY (formerly the History Channel). The episode features excerpts from his 2013 interview and reveals how the Mexican chemist “contributed to our salvation from a global environmental problem that could have catastrophic consequences.”

Molina was the first to notice that chlorofluorocarbons—better known as CFCs—had the potential of destroying the Earth’s protective ozone layer. He shared the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with his mentor, Frank Sherwood Rowland, and Dutch scientist Paul Crutzen.

Listen to the podcast >>

Listen to the oral history interview >>

Above: Mario Molina (left) and Frank Sherwood Rowland at UC Irvine, January 1975. University of California, Irvine

More News

people gathered outside at a festival
news

Color History, Dyeing Demos, Cyanotype Printing Draw Record-Setting Crowd at Institute’s 2nd Annual Curious Histories Fest

Science lovers of all ages explore every shade of the rainbow at ‘Color Your World’ celebration.

news

Science History Institute Launches ‘Voices of Science’ Oral History Video Project

Hear the stories of five scientists who faced personal, professional, and social challenges in their careers.

illustration of overlapping colors
news

Science History Institute Launches New Season of ‘Distillations’ Podcast

Weekly episodes explore surprising stories about color, drug treatments, psychiatry, and more starting June 4.

    Republish

    Copy the above HTML to republish this content. We have formatted the material to follow our guidelines, which include our credit requirements. Please review our full list of guidelines for more information. By republishing this content, you agree to our republication requirements.